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Further interesting SHARE Findings

Selected findings from SHARE First Results Books:

  • The importance of social ties in a disadvantaged area of living: Although most older Europeans live in environmentally satisfactory neighbourhoods and have socially cohesive relationships with their neighbours, there are within-country differences in social cohesion. Not surprisingly, residents of socially cohesive neighbourhoods are more satisfied with their lives. However, this is particularly true for those living in otherwise deprived neighbourhoods. In other words, social ties become even more important for subjective well-being of older people when they reside in otherwise deprived neighbourhoods.
  • Identifying high-risk groups for being affected by social exclusion: SHARE data can be used to identify groups that are at particular risk of being affected by social exclusion. Examples are people with a migration background, caregivers and in particular daughters of people in need for care:
    1. Migration background: Despite some country differences the predominant pattern found in Europe is that migrants are significantly more often deprived materially in later life, and to a lesser extent socially, compared to natives. This deprivation risk is more pronounced for people who migrated themselves, compared to those whose parents had migrated. In fact, in terms of social deprivation the latter group does not differ from the native older population and differences in the level of material deprivation can be attributed to differences in basic socio-economic characteristics and citizenship status
    2. Informal caregivers:Caregivers aged 50 and older appear to feel lonelier than people who do not look after a dependent person. This is the case because family responsibilities are considered burdensome. Accordingly, loneliness among caregivers is reduced when care services are available, when a state provides more care services.
    3. Daughters: Having children, especially daughters, plays an important role in the supply of informal care as children serve as potential informal caregivers. At the same time, this availability of potential caregivers decreases the probability of purchasing private voluntary long-term care insurance. The burden of care can then have several adverse effects on, e.g., health or professional career of the caregivers, which are most often daughters. This finding calls for policies encouraging the availability and purchase of voluntary long-term care also for the benefit of family members otherwise negatively affected.

 

More SHARE Research Findings:

 

Are People with High Cognitive Resources More Active?

New SHARE-based study investigates a temporal precedence between cognition and physical activity after the age of 50.

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The Challenge of e-Inclusion in Europe

Recent studies with SHARE data analyse internet use in the age cohorts 50+ and recommend strategies for digital inclusion.

>>Read more

Being Social Helps You to Stay Mentally Fit

A SHARE-based study shows that sociality improves both quality of life and cognitive functions in old age.

>>Read more

Explanations for the Gender Gap in Late-life Cognition

Data from SHARE and its sister studies suggest a link between improved living standards and cognition ability in later life.

>>Read more

How Life Goes on for Older Women in Europe after Loss of Their Partner

New study with SHARE data examines the influence of the perceived quality of social relations on older European women’s mental health after the loss of a partner.

>>Read more

The Influence of Religiousness on Mental Health

Religious practices provide resources, which prevent depressive symptoms.

>>Read more

The Impact of Childhood Circumstances on Mental Health in Later Life

Adverse socioeconomic conditions during childhood negatively influence mental health in later life, a study with SHARE data finds.

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Explaining Different Rates of Cognitive Decline across Europe

Differences in cognitive performance and cognitive decline across Europe suggest that socioeconomic factors influence cognitive aging.

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The Effectiveness of Tobacco Control Policies

Researchers confirm that tobacco control policies reduce smoking prevalence and increase life expectancy

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Social Capital in Old Age

Networking, volunteering, and attending clubs in later life improves self-perceived health

>> Read more

Better Education May Slow Cognitive Decline

New study based on SHARE-data explores the association between education and cognitive change in later life in Denmark

>> Read more

Are volunteers happier?

New SHARE study explores the effects of voluntary work on life satisfaction in midlife and old age

>> Read more

Educational inequalities and cognition in old age

New study with SHARE date explores the impact of educational inequalities on cognition in old age

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Internet use among older Europeans

New SHARE-based study explores the drivers of Internet use among Europeans aged 50+

>> Read more

Do women in Europe live longer and happier lives than men?

New SHARE-based study is among the first to explore gender differences in happy life expectancy

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Are immigrants healthier than natives?

New study with SHARE data compares the health effects of different immigration policies in Europe and Israel

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Women in gender-equal countries perform better in cognitive tests

Cognitive abilities of women after midlife may be affected by the gender-role attitudes in their countries of residence, indicates this new study based on SHARE data.

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Life History and the Risk of Death

New study discusses how an individual's past influences their risk of an untimely death.

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The taller, the happier?

International study analyses the link between body height and well-being among people 50+

>> Read more